Sunday, March 9, 2008

Dry Fire: Wall Drill

Courtesy of Pistol-Training.com, I recently revised my dry-fire regimen, and this Saturday it paid off nicely.

I switched from dry-shooting a target to what is called the "wall drill." Instead of having any target - dot on wall, bullseye target, piece of wood, etc., you point the (unloaded) gun at a plain, white wall (with no one and nothing behind it). The benefit of this is that you can only focus on three things: grip, sight picture, and trigger pull. Zero distractions. This is one of those "should be painfully obvious" things - pure fundementals practice - but fortunately Todd Green at Pistol-Training.com has laid it out simply and effectively. And dear God was it cringeworthy to see how messy my DA really was.

The nice thing about the wall drill is its adaptability. Since I shoot a "TDA" SIG (another handy term from Todd - "Traditional Double Action" - TDA rolls off the tongue quite a bit more nicely than "DA/SA w/ decocker"), I can practice pairs - double/single, or I can focus on doubles only or singles only. This eliminates any trouble with two different trigger pulls. No, really, it simply doesn't matter anymore. Additionally, I can include reload drills, tap-rack-bangs, etc., as I see fit. A good drill was a DA/SA pair + reload + another pair. This ensures I maintain the 'master grip' after a mag switch, since a shift in grip results in a sloppy DA pull.

Two habits I seem to have picked up: using the very tip of the trigger finger for DA pulls (awesome - zero lateral wobble) and manipulating the magazine release with the offhand thumb, since I have to shift my shooting hand to thumb the mag release. The latter results in a sort of 'teacup grip' that catches the mag as it exits the well. Clean, smooth, and postitive magazine retention. Recommended!

Good use of the wall drill seems to eat bad fundementals habits for breakfast. And it's suprisingly addictive - I gave myself 5 min DA, 5 min SA, and found myself doing mag switches for another 20+ min with no desire to stop. And, yes, even 10 minutes seems to help.

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